News

Jan 18, 2015

Rummell’s Healthy Town project will soon have a site plan — and a new name

The Jacksonville Business Journal – by Andrew Thurlow, Reporter

The horizontal site plan for the Healthy Town development slated for the JEA’s Southbank property should be completed by fall, the developers said Thursday, and will include 100,000 square feet of retail and the “best” bar and restaurant in Jacksonville.

Real estate mogul Peter Rummell and local developer Mike Balanky unveiled more details about the multifamily and mixed-use development at the site during a sold-out NAIOP and CREW business luncheon at the River Club. They hope to have 1,000 residential units, including high-end condos.
One detail: The name of the development will neither be Healthy Town nor Elements, the moniker given in the developer’s submission to JEA.
In the next few weeks, the developers said they plan to set up a community engagement meeting or contest to generate ideas for the name of the project.
The Healthy Town idea is a living environment concept with all the elements, facilities, amenities and resources necessary to promote the optimal health of the people who live there, Rummell said. The idea resembles a large lifestyle neighborhood, complete with a “base camp” for health and wellness guidance that will connect people to the classes or hobbies they desire.
“I’ll be tremendously disappointed if this turns into any kind of senior living,” Rummell said. “It needs to bring 25-year-olds and 65-year-olds together. … How do we become a combination of Naples and Austin, Texas?”
Rummell described Austin as a place where younger generations roam like they own the place: “There’s got to be a way that brings together the best of both worlds.”
Beyond the requisite bike paths and fitness center, the town will integrate natural and virtual environments that are solely designed to support healthy living. Plans for the development include adopting new ways for people to keep fit, such as the implementation of “unintentional exercise” through small changes in traditional infrastructure, Rummell said.
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